Judicial Records

Judicial records have typically been cloaked somewhat by the practical difficulty and expense of retrieving paper records from court clerks and then copying them. Judicial records are generally open to the public for examination,inspection, and copying during regular office hours, subject to reasonable inspection restrictions to ensure the integrity of those records. Although their informational content varies widely, judicial records can be an important source for studies of judicial administration, commerce and corporate history, labor relations and union activity, immigration and ethnic groups, civil rights, state and local political activity, biography, criminology, economic studies, and the impact of federal regulatory programs. The custodian of judicial records is usually the judge of the court. Some university judicial records are open because they fall under the open meetings laws for the individual state. Any person desiring to inspect, examine or copy judicial records shall make an oral or written request to the custodian. Judicial records for legal research. Judicial records are one of the best sources for legal, economic, and social research. Although their informational content varies widely, judicial records can be an important source for studies of judicial administration, commerce and corporate history, labor relations and union activity, immigration and ethnic groups, civil rights, state and local political activity, biography, criminology, economic studies, and the impact of federal regulatory programs. Even in states where the judicial system seems to be aiming to make such information available via remote electronic access, the information is sometimes is not fully available in every county. Your judicial record is not part of your academic transcript, unless you are suspended or permanently dismissed from the university. Copies of judicial decisions contained in any of the law or equity reports in the state library, and of any other papers or documents contained in such library, certified by the state librarian, shall be received in evidence in like manner and with like effect as the originals.

Ian Mate writes here at Judicial Records.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: